FAQs - Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Why isn't the club paying for the preservation?

A: ECC does not have the financial means and does not feel it is appropriate to assess members - that does not immediately show a return on investment.

Approval was granted from the ECC Board to raise funds (beginning at $100,000) to be raised within 18 months. We hope to have a contractor lined up by spring of 2006 to begin preservation efforts, but time is of the essence because unless the funds are raised within this period of time, ECC may decide to withhold our ability to preserve this historic landmark.

Q: What is the money going to cover?

A:

  • Removal of loose and flaking exterior paint by a licensed abatement contractor.
  • Removal and disposal of some rotted wood at the roof eaves, porch floors, and some rails.
  • Repair of the exterior doors, windows, rotted windowsills, shutters, exterior trim, porch floors, stairs and railings. Some of the above items will need to be replaced; the exact items will have to be determined as the work progresses.
  • Minor stucco repair.
  • Gutter and downspout repair or replacement.
  • Repaint and re-caulk the exterior (one coat only) is included.

Q: What is the goal?

A: Raise $100K for exterior preservation. ECC Board has given approval to raise the funds and have the preservation construction completed, with the understanding that there must be a minimum of $100K to begin work. The funds must be raised within 18 months.

Q: What is the long-term plan for the Manor House?

A: Preserve exterior in order to improve aesthetics to create the opportunity for outside benefactor to invest, or allow ECC to create a use.

Q: What's in it for me? Why should I donate?

A: The Manor House is a large draw for potential new business including new members, more social functions such as weddings and golf outing. This renovation is the main draw to ECC and will help enrich to club golf facilities, the neighborhood's home value, and preserve the historical significance - which is what makes ECC a unique and attractive country club and community. The better ECC does financially - the more you will benefit from a higher quality experience as a member (more funds for golf course, pool, service, etc.).

Q: Is the Manor House structurally sound?

A: A structural engineer working in the field of restoration of old buildings has evaluated the exterior and interior (basement to attic). The building was found to be structurally sound and is free from termite or other major damage. The building is constructed well. The stone walls of the main (center) portion of the house are 2 feet in thickness.

Q: Is my contribution tax deductible?

A: No. The Manor House Preservation Fund, Inc. is incorporated in Virginia as a non-profit, however, it does not have 501 c(3) status from the IRS and therefore the donations are not tax deductible.

Q: Why isn't the Manor House Preservation Fund, Inc. approved for 501 c(3) status from the IRS?

A: To receive 501 c(3) status a Foundation would need to be setup for the historical preservation for the public benefit. The major beneficiary of the preservation of the Manor House is ECC, a private owner.

Q: I've heard about private historic buildings that maintained by a foundation. Why not the Manor House?

A: Most likely a historic easement was granted to a foundation. This is typically used in Washington DC where the owners are given tax benefits for a façade easement. Since the foundations are 501 c(3) organizations, donations to the foundations are tax deductible. However, the easements are granted for perpetuity; the building must not be demolished and other restrictions apply.

Q: Is the Manor House eligible for listing on the National Register of History Places?

A: Yes. The building has sufficient historical significance to receive this honorary designation. Application would be made at the state level. The Manor House Preservation Committee could nominate the building, however, the owner, ECC, would need to approved the nomination. The BOD is willing to consider having the building listed and it is one of the future goals of the Manor House Preservation Committee.

Q: Are there advantages for the building being listed on the National Register of Historic Places?

A: Yes. Tax credits are available at the Federal and State level. Thus this designation would make the building more attractive for an outside investor to come in and rehab the building for reuse. A dollar for dollar tax credit would be available.

Q: What happens to our contributions if an outside agency takes legal control of the building before the exterior work is started? (Example 1: the building is leased to an organization that will rehab the building for reuse. Example 2: the building burns down before the repairs begin.)

A: The accounting of the funds collected will be complete and accurate. The funds will be returned to those who made the donations. John Atkinson, a CPA, and former President of the ECC will be the accountant.

Q: Once the repairs are started will our investment be protected?

A: Yes. A builder's risk policy will be purchased through the National Trust for Historic Preservation Insurance Group for the building in the amount of money for the repairs (estimated to be about $125k) Note: there is currently no fire insurance policy on the manor house.

Q: I am on the "Do Not Call" list. Why was I called?

A: Calls are made by Manor House Preservation Committee members or volunteers (first party calls) requesting a charitable donation to our non-profit group for the preservation of the exterior of the Evergreen Manor House. Request for donations are permitted under the Telemarketing Sales Rule (TSR).

The information below is from the "Do Not Call" list's website:

http://www.donotcall.gov

Q: Who May or May Not Call?
Q: Who is covered by the National Do Not Call Registry?

The National Do Not Call Registry applies to any plan, program, or campaign to sell goods or services through interstate phone calls. This includes telemarketers who solicit consumers, often on behalf of third party sellers. It also includes sellers who provide, offer to provide, or arrange to provide goods or services to consumers in exchange for payment.

The National Do Not Call Registry does not limit calls by political organizations, charities, or telephone surveyors.

Q: Are calls from political organizations or calls soliciting for charities covered?

Political solicitations are not covered by the TSR at all, since they are not included in its definition of “telemarketing.” Charities are not covered by the requirements of the national registry. However, if a third-party telemarketer is calling on behalf of a charity, a consumer may ask not to receive any more calls from, or on behalf of, that specific charity. If a third-party telemarketer calls again on behalf of that charity, the telemarketer may be subject to a fine of up to $11,000.


HOME | ABOUT THIS SITE | PRESERVATION GOALS | DONATIONS | MANOR HOUSE HISTORY | HISTORIC IMAGES | CONTACT US | NOTICE/DISCLAIMER

© 2005 Evergreen Manor House Preservation Committee

Evergreen Manor House Preservation Committee
Box 962, Haymarket, Virginia 20168